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Category Archive for '18 Exploring Disability Studies'

“My experiences and perspectives on the lack of empathy in psychiatry” Nurul Fadiah Johari   Amidst the growing interest in public discourse on mental health and emphasis on fighting stigma towards mental illness, we see a dominant type of narrative emerging – one where the patient receives psychiatric treatment and regains a “normal” course of […]

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“Being d/Deaf in Singapore: A Personal Reflection of Deaf Culture and Identity” Phoebe Tay     “SEE is good for learning English because it includes all the grammatical aspects of English such as past tense. SgSL is broken English just like Singlish![1]”   “No! SEE is not a language but a system/code. SgSL is a […]

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“Universal Design: Beyond the exclusive “Barrier-Free” labels” Fiona Tan       Staring at the red keyhole intensely as if willing it to turn green, several sarcastic quips had formulated in my mind. Perhaps I would enlighten the emerging non-disabled person that the symbol on the door meant that it was for wheelchair-users, not simply […]

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“Cripping the Church: A Personal Reflection on Disability and Religion” Jacqueline Woo       It is often assumed that a writer on the topic of disability would have had a deep and intimate experience with the human condition, whether personally, or through a loved one in the family or a circle of close friends. […]

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“Looking at ‘d’ art: Fab or fad?” Alvan Yap   I have a disability; in fact, it’s “official”, as evinced by my transport concession card with the SG Enable logo on it. For years, I held an editorial job; in fact, I worked on fiction and poetry books, which presumably pinned me squarely in the […]

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Editorial – “Exploring Disability Studies in Singapore: Reflections on methodology” Kuansong Zhuang, Victor       As a field of study, disability studies has in the last thirty years seen increased interest and exponential growth in academic institutions in Britain and America. However, disability studies is very much nascent in Singapore despite our common shared […]

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